The Grit And Realism Of “The Sportswriter”

Here’s another great review by Robert of 101 Books. He’s reading his way through Time Magazine’s 100 Greatest Novels since 1923 (plus Ulysses). It includes an excerpt and I like his idea that this book has the feel of an Updike novel. Updike has some books on my “to read” list, especially since seeing the movie Words and Pictures that had so many intriguing allusions to Updike. Hope you enjoy my Sunday reblog!

101 Books

The Sportswriter has that gritty, realistic feel of an Updike novel.

To this point, it’s not near as dark as Rabbit Run, but the overall “feel” is the same.

Frank Bascombe is a failed novelist-turned successful sportswriter, divorced with 3 kids, one of whom recently passed. His background is sad, but he’s by no means given up on life. More than anything, he seems to be floating through life—simply responding to what comes his way.

The novel just has such an intuitive grasp of the human condition—on the slightly cynical side of things. I love how Frank describes selflessness and friendship in this passage, which follows a meeting with an acquaintance, Walter, who awkwardly reveals he’s gay.

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About mysm2000

Having taught elementary school for more than 25 years and been involved in many amazing technology and curriculum projects, I find I've developed a myriad of interests based on literature I've read and music I've heard. I've followed The Wright Three to Chicago, Ansel Adams to Colorado, The Kon Tiki Expedition to Easter Island, Simon & Garfunkel lyrics to New York City, Frank Lloyd Wright to Fallingwater, Pennsylvania, and have only just begun.
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